Cover us in glory

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Fowllyd posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

Originally posted by saintbletch

Originally posted by Fowllyd

Originally posted by saintbletch

So here's a relatively new one to me.

Long story, well a story that spans a long period of time anyway. My memory is a bit sketchy as my synapses had cider in them at the time, but a few months before Arthur Lee died, a mate and I went to see him at The Brook. He was the frontman of the band Love. I didn't know much about him/them before going, but my mate (who is older) was a massive fan. Anyway, it was a great night and even though he was getting on, he put on a great show.

Fast forward to last month and me and the same mate are at a Calexico gig in London and as part of the encore, they played this.

A cover of Love's Alone again, or...

Was almost spiritually good. 

Forever Changes, recorded in 1967 and from which Alone again or... is taken, is a masterpiece. I saw Arthur Lee perform the LP at the RFH about a dozen years ago and he was excellent. I like that Calexico version, mind.

Just wanted to say that since this 'chat', and following my walk to Hursley where I discussed Love with the same mate mentioned above, I've been playing Forever Changes every day.

I found a version that was recorded live - perhaps during the tour you saw, and it's stunning. The original recording - or at least my copy, features some pretty dodgy stero mixing, so the live version is a real treat. 

So whilst this is definitely not a cover, and therefore off-topic, I'll risk the infraction...

Now that's a real treat.Recorded in 2003 I notice, which was the same year that I saw them at the RFH.

Crap stereo mixing was endemic in the sixties I think - maybe engineers were still getting used to what could be done with stereo, plus of course a massive number of records were remastered into stereo having originally been released in mono. All too often you'll find an LP where, for example, two instruments play out of one speaker and two others from the other one - which is pretty rubbish. Many aficionadoes of the Zim reckon his sixties recordings (certainly up as far as Blonde on Blonde) are better listened to in mono.

The CD version of Forever Changes that I have includes a number of excellent bonus tracks, including alternative takes of Alone Again, Or and You set the Scene. There's also a tracking version of the instrumental track for an unreleased (I think) song, which gives you a real picture of the recording process. This version ends with a full take, following which Lee scolds Johnny Echols for a below-par guitar solo which closes out the song. The next track up is the full version, complete with vocals, followed by Lee's comment: "That guitar solo was out of sight, man." Brilliant.

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Arthurhucksake posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

This one of the better covers i've heard

 

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saintbletch posted this 31 May 2015

Didn't realise it was a cover - excellent choice Art.

pap posted this 31 May 2015

Originally posted by saintbletch

Didn't realise it was a cover - excellent choice Art.

On that note, here's an interesting link, 20 Songs You Might Not Know Were Covers.   "When the levee breaks" is among them.

Fowllyd posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

Originally posted by pap

Originally posted by saintbletch

Didn't realise it was a cover - excellent choice Art.

On that note, here's an interesting link, 20 Songs You Might Not Know Were Covers.   "When the levee breaks" is among them.

One could argue that a fair number of Led Zeppelin songs are to all intents and purposes covers - they just had 'Plant/Page' as the writing credit on the record. Examples include Whole Lotta Love (Willie Dixon's You need Love), The Lemon Song (Howlin' Wolf's Killing Floor, with a middle-eight taken from a Robert Johnson song, though he may well have got it from elsewhere). This was all back in the seventies; I have a feeling that more recent copies of Led Zeppelin LPs attribute the songs' origins rather better.

Of the Papster's list, I have to admit I hadn't even heard of a fair number of them - original or cover. My pet hate cover is on that list though - Blondie's shockingly bad version of the Paragons' Tide is High.

Here's a cover - or is it? Writing credits are Jagger/Richards, though many reckon that Gram had a lot to do with the writing - the words certainly sound like his work. His version was released as a single before the Stones released it, but they recorded it first.

saintbletch posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

Originally posted by Fowllyd

Originally posted by pap

Originally posted by saintbletch

Didn't realise it was a cover - excellent choice Art.

On that note, here's an interesting link, 20 Songs You Might Not Know Were Covers.   "When the levee breaks" is among them.

One could argue that a fair number of Led Zeppelin songs are to all intents and purposes covers - they just had 'Plant/Page' as the writing credit on the record. Examples include Whole Lotta Love (Willie Dixon's You need Love), The Lemon Song (Howlin' Wolf's Killing Floor, with a middle-eight taken from a Robert Johnson song, though he may well have got it from elsewhere). This was all back in the seventies; I have a feeling that more recent copies of Led Zeppelin LPs attribute the songs' origins rather better.

Of the Papster's list, I have to admit I hadn't even heard of a fair number of them - original or cover. My pet hate cover is on that list though - Blondie's shockingly bad version of the Paragons' Tide is High.

Here's a cover - or is it? Writing credits are Jagger/Richards, though many reckon that Gram had a lot to do with the writing - the words certainly sound like his work. His version was released as a single before the Stones released it, but they recorded it first.

That's a really nice version.

Are you suggesting (conspiracy) that it wasn't written by Jagger/Richards? How would that be explained?

My mate Halo (the other one) is always trying to get me to listen to Gram Parsons. Haven't heard enough to be knowledgeable though.

saintbletch posted this 31 May 2015

I can't believe we got this far without me posting this.

I love this song and whilst Costello's version is great, it's Robert Wyatt's that I was first familar with.

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Fowllyd posted this 31 May 2015

Originally posted by saintbletch

I can't believe we got this far without me posting this.

I love this song and whilst Costello's version is great, it's Robert Wyatt's that I was first familar with.

Ditto in both respects. I remember buying the Robert Wyatt LP which has that on (Nothing Can Stop Us) way, way back; I knew that Shipbuilding was an Elvis Costello song, but I'd never heard his version of it. Nor did I for a good few years, now I come to think of it. No question that Costello writes superb political songs, all the more so for their subtlety.

Fowllyd posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

Originally posted by saintbletch

That's a really nice version.

Are you suggesting (conspiracy) that it wasn't written by Jagger/Richards? How would that be explained?

My mate Halo (the other one) is always trying to get me to listen to Gram Parsons. Haven't heard enough to be knowledgeable though.

Well, Gram was very matey indeed with Keith (apparently Anita Pallenberg didn't much care for Gram, but that's another matter). They hung out together, did a load of drink and drugs and all the usual rock star bit. The song itself is reckoned to have been written for Gram by Jagger and Richards; both he and the Stones recorded it. However, there are those who were around at the time, and particularly those closer to Gram, who reckon that the writing credit should either include him or just be Parsons. I guess that if the song was published by Jagger and Richards' publisher, it would have been attributed to them and copyrighted as such. Gram would quite likely have been way t ofar off his face to notice.

Your mate, the other Halo, is clearly a man of great taste and discernment.

Arthurhucksake posted this 31 May 2015 - Last edited 31 May 2015

This is a fantastic cover , miles better than the original with the added bonus that Bobby Rondinelli is a way better drummer than Phil collins..

 

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